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CFL on NFL network?

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CFL on NFL network?

Postby CharginBrowns » Tue Jun 07, 2005 2:14 pm

Hey I'm a native Canadian, so I will be getting CFL broadcasts, but I had heard rumblings of the NFL network carrying CFL games. Is there any truth to that?
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Postby Dr. Duran Duran » Tue Jun 07, 2005 2:16 pm

I haven't heard anything about that, but I'd like to be one of the first to say how awesome that would be. My friends and I wanted to start a CFL fantasy league but opted out since we couldn't watch the games. This could change all that.
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Postby CharginBrowns » Tue Jun 07, 2005 2:32 pm

The CFL is a really fun league, i like it. No one pretends its the NFL, but hell- its football when there's no football, and America watches Arena football!!!! so the CFL would do gurrrrrrrrrreat
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Re: CFL on NFL network?

Postby MadScott » Tue Jun 07, 2005 3:25 pm

CharginBrowns wrote:Hey I'm a native Canadian, so I will be getting CFL broadcasts, but I had heard rumblings of the NFL network carrying CFL games. Is there any truth to that?


This move really wouldn't surprise me at all seeings as the NFL owns a controlling interest in both that and the Arena league as well I believe. Hey, I'm in favor any and all football at any time.
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Re: CFL on NFL network?

Postby Dr. Duran Duran » Tue Jun 07, 2005 4:47 pm

MadScott wrote:
CharginBrowns wrote:Hey I'm a native Canadian, so I will be getting CFL broadcasts, but I had heard rumblings of the NFL network carrying CFL games. Is there any truth to that?


This move really wouldn't surprise me at all seeings as the NFL owns a controlling interest in both that and the Arena league as well I believe. Hey, I'm in favor any and all football at any time.


Agreed. Any football is better than no football so I'll certainly watch if the NFL Network wants to bring some northern ball to the masses. Anyone here know what the biggest differences are between the CFL and NFL other than the talent pool? Are there different rules etc...
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Postby Santacruzer » Tue Jun 07, 2005 4:59 pm

Yeah, there are a lot of different rules.

only 3 downs, instead of 4 - one of the biggest factors in it being a faster and pass oriented game

12 players on the field for both teams

the field is 110 yards long, and 65 yards wide (NFL is 53 1/3 yards wide)

The ball is bigger, not much, but bigger

And the playoff games as well as the Grey Cup (Superbowl) almost always gets played outside in the snow, where playoff football belongs!!!
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Postby MadScott » Tue Jun 07, 2005 5:06 pm

Important differences
There are several important specific differences between the Canadian and American versions of the game of football:

Playing area
The playing field in Canadian football field is generally larger, similar to those of American fields prior to 1912. The Canadian field of play is 110 yards long and 65 yards wide, rather than 100 yards by 53⅓ as in American football. The end zones in Canadian football are anywhere between ten to fifteen yards deeper, although the Canadian Football League uses 20-yard end zones. The goalposts for kicking are placed at the goal line in Canadian football and the end line in the American game. Frequently, however, the Canadian field will have its end zone truncated at the corners so that the field fits in the infield of a track. The distance between a sideline and a hash mark are the same in both fields.

Because of the larger field, many American football venues are generally unfit for the Canadian game. In many American venues, the sidelines and endlines would be several rows into the stands. During the CFL's failed expansion to American cities, Canadian football was either played on converted baseball grounds, or in some cases, on a field designed for American football. The Alamodome is the only American venue built with Canadian football (the CFL's San Antonio Texans) in mind, although it is now no longer used for this purpose.

Team size
Canadian teams have twelve men per side, while American teams use eleven men. Both games have the same number of men required at the line of scrimmage, hence the twelfth man in the Canadian game plays a backfield position.

Because of this, position designations of the various offensive and defensive lines vary. For example, there is no tight end in Canadian football and no slotback in American football.

The ball
Contrary to popular belief, the footballs used in both the CFL and NFL are the same size. Both balls are approximately 28 inches in circumference. The difference in the balls is in the one inch white line painted at each end of the CFL football. It is these white lines that give the CFL Football a more spherical look then that of its NFL counterpart.

Number of downs
In both games, a team will have a limited number of downs to advanced the ball ten yards. In American football, there are four downs, while in Canadian football, there are only three.

Scrimmage
In both games, the ball is placed at a line of scrimmage, in which a player, known as the center, performs a snap to start a football play. The defensive team must stay a distance away on their side of the line of scrimmage. If an offensive play results in the goal line being inside such a distance, the ball is moved back so that the defense is positioned at the goal line.

In Canadian football, this distance is a full yard. That is, a play can never start inside the defending team's one-yard line. Because of this one-yard distance, teams will tend to gamble on third and one. In American football, the distance is eleven inches - the length of the ball, creating the illusion of the teams being "nose-to-nose" against each other.

Fair catch
In American football, if a punt returner sees that, in his judgement, he will be unable to advance the ball after catching it, he may signal for a fair catch by waving his right hand in the air, and forego the attempt to advance. If he makes this signal, the opposing team must allow him to attempt to field the ball cleanly; if he is interfered with, the team covering the kick will be penalized fifteen yards. Conversely, there is no fair catch rule in Canadian football: instead no players from the kicking team except the kicker and any player who was behind him when he kicked the ball may ever approach within five yards of the ball until it is or has been in the opponents' possession.

Furthermore, in American football the receiving team may elect not to play the ball if the prospects for a return are not good and the returner is not certain he can successfully catch the ball on the fly; American players are generally taught not to attempt to touch a bouncing football. Oftentimes, the ball hits the ground and is surrounded by players from the kicking team, who allow it to roll dead, at which point play is stopped. In Canadian football the ball must be played by the receiving team.

Backfield in motion
In Canadian football all offensive backfield players, except the quarterback, may be in motion at the snap -- players in motion may move in any direction as long as they are behind the line of scrimmage at the snap.

In American football, only one backfield player is allowed to be in motion, and he cannot move toward the line of scrimmage until after the ball is snapped.

Time rules
American football rules allow each team to have three timeouts in each half, as well as the two-minute warning. In the Canadian Football League, each team has only one time-out, while at lower levels of Canadian football each team has two. However, at all levels of Canadian football, the clock is stopped after every play during the last three minutes of each half.

Timing rules change drastically after the N-minute warning in both leagues. In American football, the clock continues to run after any tackle in bounds, but stops after an incomplete pass, or a tackle out of bounds. If the clock stops, it is restarted at the snap of the ball. In Canadian football, the clock stops after every play, but the starting time differs depending on the result of the previous play: after a tackle in bounds, the clock restarts when the referee whistles the ball in; after an incomplete pass or a tackle out of bounds, the clock restarts when the ball is snapped.

These timing differences make for spectacularly different end-games if the team leading the game has the ball. In American football, if the other team is out of time-outs, it is possible to run slightly more than 160 seconds off the clock (almost three minutes) without gaining a first down. In Canadian football, just over 60 seconds can be run off.

In American football, the clock need not run out for the half or the game to be called. Canadian football requires that the clock be run out for the half or the game to be called. A final play is also permitted if time expires between plays in Canadian football.

In Canadian football, the offensive team must run a play within 20 seconds of the referee whistling the play in; in American football, teams have 45 seconds from the end of the previous play.

Kicker advancing the ball
The Canadian kicker, or a player behind the kicker when he kicks the ball, may recover his own kick and advance with the ball. American kickers are not allowed to do so, except on a kick-off, when the kicker and anyone behind him (e.g. the entire team, lest they be off-side), are eligible to recover the ball; hence the "onside kick" play. Canadian football extends this principle to all kicks, including those downfield.

Defensive line
The defensive line can only hold up a receiver within 1 yard of the scrimmage lines in the CFL, as opposed to 5 yards in the NFL, allowing for more open plays.

Fumbles
In Canadian play, if the ball is fumbled, the last team to touch the ball before it goes out of bounds gets possession -- rather than the last team to possess the ball as in American Football.

Field goals
Missed field goals which do not hit the uprights are live in Canadian football – if the ball is not returned out of the end zone, the kicking team receives a single point (a "rouge"), but the returner has the possibility of returning the missed kick for a touchdown; failing this, his team will receive possession at the point to which he returns the ball.

Following a successful field goal, in Canadian rules, the team scored upon has the option of receiving a kickoff or scrimmaging at its own 35 yard line – as opposed to there being a kickoff after every score in American football.

Extra points
In both games, after a touchdown is scored, the scoring team must then convert the touchdown, which may be done through a kick or a scrimmage. If done through a kick, the scoring team scores one point, and if done from a scrimmage, the scoring team scores two. However, the position of the ball for conversions is different in the two games.

Conversions are taken between the 2- or 3-yard line in American football, and at the 5-yard line in Canadian football. However, the Canadian kicker is actually closer to the goalposts, which are on the goal line in Canada and on the end line in the United States.

In Canadian football, the scoring team may also score singles from a missed kick conversion, subject to the regular rules of singles.

During conversions, the ball is considered live in Canadian football and American football at the college level. As such, this allows the defensive team to score two points on an interception or fumble return. However, in the National Football League and other levels of American football, the ball is considered dead on a turnover.

Other differences
There is no single-point score in American football; the same events that result in a single in Canadian football, result only in the award of a touchback in American play. Canadian receivers need only have one foot in bounds for a catch to count as a reception, as in American high school and college football. NFL play requires two feet in bounds.

CFL roster sizes are 40 players (rather than 53 as in the NFL), comprising 19 non-imports (essentially, Canadians), 18 imports, and 3 quarterbacks.

While the traditional American football season runs from September or late August until December with the NFL playoffs occurring in January, the CFL regular season begins in July so that the playoffs can be completed by mid-November, an important consideration for a sport played in outdoor venues in locations such as Edmonton, Alberta and Regina, Saskatchewan


http://www.biography.ms/Comparison_of_C ... tball.html

Actually, the ball size is the same, just the stripe is different.
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Postby Santacruzer » Tue Jun 07, 2005 5:13 pm

The ball
Contrary to popular belief, the footballs used in both the CFL and NFL are the same size. Both balls are approximately 28 inches in circumference. The difference in the balls is in the one inch white line painted at each end of the CFL football. It is these white lines that give the CFL Football a more spherical look then that of its NFL counterpart.

The circumference even looks different when you compare the 2 side by side, I didn't think it to be an optical illusion......

The CFL even marketed themselves in the 90's with a slogan "Our Balls Are Bigger". I thought it was hillarious and brilliant marketing at the time. I wonder why they perpetuated the lie?
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Postby MadScott » Tue Jun 07, 2005 5:20 pm

Santacruzer wrote:I wonder why they perpetuated the lie?


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:-b
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Postby Santacruzer » Tue Jun 07, 2005 5:32 pm

Ah yes, Blame Canada!!!
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