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Postby CC » Tue Jan 02, 2007 4:25 pm

Metroid wrote:
The Lung wrote:
Metroid wrote:I think Jarrett has better hands than TO.


This season, 90% of the WRs in the league had better hands than T.O. :-t


For sure, I guess my point was Look at TO, teams still want him with all his baggage and Jarrett has better hands than TO. That taunting in the Rose bowl wont hurt his draft status one bit. :-?


Jarrett may have better hands but TO is a much, much better WR. Some people have Ted Ginn rated above Jarrett.
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Postby Metroid » Tue Jan 02, 2007 4:35 pm

CC wrote:
Metroid wrote:
The Lung wrote:
Metroid wrote:I think Jarrett has better hands than TO.


This season, 90% of the WRs in the league had better hands than T.O. :-t


For sure, I guess my point was Look at TO, teams still want him with all his baggage and Jarrett has better hands than TO. That taunting in the Rose bowl wont hurt his draft status one bit. :-?


Jarrett may have better hands but TO is a much, much better WR. Some people have Ted Ginn rated above Jarrett.


Sure, I agree with everything you just said. It was never my intention to say Jarrett was a better receiver. ;-D
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Postby NittanyLions » Tue Jan 02, 2007 8:09 pm

All I have to say is what an embarrassment for Michigan, the one time I go and vote for them :-t
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Postby BritSox » Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:58 am

Sandrock wrote:
deerayfan072 wrote:
flotsamnjetsam wrote:Man I really wish USC beat UCLA so we could've seen them play Ohio State. I really think that game would've been awesome.


Don't worry when UF will show you a great game, especially when they beat OSU


Now that we see how overrated Michigan really was, it makes me think Florida has a far better shot than I anticipated.


Then again, the fact that both PSU and Wisconsin, by consensus weaker teams than the Buckeyes, both turned over pretty good SEC sides indicates the contrary. I can't say the previous Bowl games have really changed my view- OSU ought to win, but in a two-horse race, the underdog always has a shot, especially with a guy like Meyer calling the shots.
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Postby stomperrob » Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:50 pm


Published: January 03. 2007 3:00AM
Michael Rosenberg
MICHAEL ROSENBERG: In lieu of flowers, send U-M a new philosophy
January 3, 2007

PASADENA, Calif. -- After watching Southern California beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl, I'm not sure if I should be writing a column or a eulogy. Either way, I guess I should begin with some meaningful quote from the past. So here we go:

"Defensively, we did not have the answers to the spread offense. I haven't seen anyone who has. We're in a new era of college football, and I think defensive coaches are in the same position that people were in 25 years ago when the wishbone offense came into fashion. Until somebody does come up with the answers, you're going to see more of that offense. You're going to see a lot of points scored."

Lloyd Carr said that.

The date was Nov. 6.

That is: Nov. 6, 2000.

More than six years have passed since Northwestern used the spread to pile up 54 points and 654 yards on Michigan. U-M has made many changes to adjust to the spread -- and at times, Michigan has defended against the spread remarkably well. But in six years, the Wolverines never really asked themselves this question:

If the spread is so tough to stop, why aren't we using it ourselves?

Chad Henne told me last week that his high school ran "more of shotgun, spread offense, with me running what Vince Young did." He quickly added that he is obviously no Vince Young. But why can't U-M put Henne in the shotgun? Why can't it run the spread and have Henne throw quick-strike passes to a loaded group of skill-position players?

Next year, Michigan should have the best receiver, running back, quarterback and offensive lineman in the Big Ten. I don't mean the best as a group. I mean each guy should be the best at his position. (In order, they are Mario Manningham, Mike Hart, Henne and Jake Long.)

The defense, however, has some serious holes to fill.

In other words, Michigan can contend for the national title next year, but not with the same "let's win a low-scoring game in the fourth quarter" attitude that led to the Rose Bowl debacle.

And this brings us to three fundamental rules that should govern Michigan's offense next year:

1. The Wolverines should go into every game figuring they must score a minimum of 30 points. Offensive coordinator Mike DeBord actually said something to that effect last summer. But in the Rose Bowl, Michigan acted like it wanted to win, 6-3.

2. They should act like the score at the start of every game is Other Guys 10, Michigan 0. U-M has actually played extremely well from behind in the Carr era -- in the 2000 Orange Bowl (down, 28-14, to Alabama in the third quarter); the 2003 Minnesota game (down, 28-7, at the start of the fourth quarter) and the 2004 Michigan State game (down, 27-10, halfway through the fourth quarter), to name a few.

When U-M has to score, it often does. And this leads us to ...

3. It should be the team it wouldn't want to face.

Ever since that 2000 Northwestern game, Carr has seemed like he would much rather face a traditional offense than a quick-hit, aggressive spread.

So why not scare opposing defensive coordinators? When everybody from John L. Smith to USC defensive end Lawrence Jackson says U-M is predictable, shouldn't Michigan take note?

I could write (and have written) an entire column about Lloyd Carr's great qualities. His teams are incredibly resilient; he wins a high percentage of his games; his teams play disciplined, fundamentally sound football, and he genuinely cares about his players and his school.

But after Monday's Rose Bowl, it has become clearer than ever that Michigan needs a change. No, not at head coach. That would be incredibly unfair. What U-M needs to change is its philosophy.

Maybe beating teams by the score of 39-32 is not the Michigan way.

But it's sure a lot more fun than losing, 32-18.

Contact MICHAEL ROSENBERG at 313-222-6052 or mailto:rosenberg@freepress.com.



Published: January 03. 2007 3:00AM
Wolverines
U-M's bowl losses are predictable

January 3, 2007


FREE PRESS SPORTS WRITER
PASADENA, Calif. -- Six seasons ago, Jim Tressel brought his four-loss, unranked Buckeyes into Michigan Stadium and beat U-M, 26-20. Tressel had promised Columbus a victory the year before when he was hired.

A month and a half later at the Citrus Bowl, Tennessee crushed the Wolverines, 45-17. Though at the time no one knew it, a pattern was taking shape. U-M has now lost its last two games of the season -- Ohio State and the bowl game -- in four of the last six seasons, including the last three.

In that span, the Wolverines have beaten Ohio State once -- in 2003 -- and Florida in the Outback Bowl after the 2002 season. Michigan hasn't won its last two games since the 2000 season.

Monday's loss to USC in the Rose Bowl was the team's fourth straight bowl loss.

When Michigan lost to Tennessee, everyone could see the team needed to get quicker. Coach Lloyd Carr admitted as much. And for the most part, the team did.

But the dispiriting losses in late November and early January continued, and after USC ran all over the field in the second half of Monday's Rose Bowl game, Carr blamed the Trojans' speed. So did many U-M players.

Said Chad Henne: "Their speed overcame ours."

In fairness, Michigan's failures came at the hands of some stellar opposition. In the 2004 Rose Bowl, USC was led by Matt Leinart, LenDale White, Reggie Bush (a freshman) and Mike Williams. In 2005, Texas had Vince Young. Monday, USC was led by Dwayne Jarrett. And for the last three seasons, the Buckeyes relied upon Troy Smith.

The Wolverines have been competitive in most of those games. Yet when another team is given a month or more to prepare for Michigan, bad things happen for the Maize and Blue. (Ohio State might only have a week, but the Buckeyes begin studying Michigan at the beginning of the season.)

USC's center, Ryan Kalil, and its defensive end, Lawrence Jackson, both talked about the predictable nature of Michigan's strategy -- on both sides of the ball. Jackson called U-M's defense traditional and stale. Meanwhile, USC -- after mustering only three points in the first half Monday -- scrapped its plan and came out throwing.

"We totally adjusted," coach Pete Carroll said. "We decided to go after them."

Of course speed alone doesn't win games.

"I'll take technique over speed any day," said U-M's speedy receiver, Mario Manningham. "When I got to college, I thought I could run by everybody. Then I learned there is a lot more to this game."

Something Michigan hasn't proven at the end of the season in a long time.

NOTEBOOK: LaMarr Woodley's sack in the second half of the Rose Bowl, gave him 12 on the season. That ties U-M's all-time record. ... Michigan's athletic director Bill Martin said Monday he is looking for an opponent for Sept. 1 -- he moved the Eastern Michigan game back into October. Martin wouldn't say whom he's considering but added it would be a Division I school.

Contact SHAWN WINDSOR at 313-222-6487 or mailto:swindsor@freepress.com.





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[liPublished]: January 02. 2007 3:00AM
Michael Rosenberg
MICHAEL ROSENBERG: Play-calling was truly embarrassing

January 2, 2007

FREE PRESS COLUMNIST
PASADENA, Calif. -- We like to say football has replaced baseball as the national pastime, but that is only partially true. The new national pastimes are gambling and complaining about play-calling. Football is the sport that lets us do those things.

I don't know much about gambling, but I know what makes a good complainer: If your team runs and gets stopped, you say it should have passed. If it throws an incomplete pass, you say it should have run.

This is why I normally stay away from that kind of thing. I figure that even the worst coaches know way more football than I do, and while it is fair to say a team failed, it is usually a cop-out to blame the guy calling plays.

Today, I am making an exception.

Michigan's play-calling in the Rose Bowl was embarrassing. Lloyd Carr and his offensive coordinator, Mike DeBord, showed no creativity, failed to adjust to Southern California's blitzes and basically tried to defeat an opposing army with a pea shooter. Michigan, so well-coached all year, was horribly outcoached in this one.

It's hard to say exactly when U-M lost this game, but I'm going with halftime.

The game was tied, 3-3. It was obvious that neither USC nor Michigan could run the ball. The difference was that USC admitted it. For one stretch, the Trojans passed on 27 consecutive plays (not counting two quarterback sneaks for first downs).

And what did Michigan do at halftime?

"The main thing that we discussed was that at some point there, getting into our two-minute offense," Carr said. "We didn't want to do that because we wanted to try to protect our quarterback and our defense."

Here's an idea: Why not protect your defense by, you know, scoring? Controlling the clock is nice. In this era, putting points on the board is more important.

Through three quarters, Michigan's running backs had 46 yards on 17 carries. For the math-challenged, that is 2.7 yards per carry.

"I'd run the ball again," DeBord said. "When you're getting sacked, tell me how you're going to keep throwing the ball and you're going to make improvements. I don't understand that. So no. I'd run the ball ... I wouldn't do anything different."

I don't have to tell DeBord how to keep throwing the ball against a vicious pass rush.

Carr can do it for me.

"They did a good job," he said of USC. "Kept the tight end in. They moved the pocket very well, with some rollouts and with some boot(legs) ... they moved the launch points, moved the pocket, and then they threw some very quick play-action (passes), got rid of the ball."

Why couldn't Michigan do any of that? For that matter, why didn't U-M put Chad Henne in the shotgun? Carr said in Michigan's offense, "the shotgun is part of the two-minute offense, late in the half, late in the game."

Guess what? That's part of the problem.

Why didn't Michigan have Henne take shorter drops, so he could get rid of the ball before the rush came?

"We did," DeBord said. "The ball got batted down once."

Oh. Well, scrap the whole idea, then.

"In the second half, the fourth quarter, we went to quicker throws and stuff like that," DeBord said.

The Wolverines did. And you know what? It worked. And that only showed that they should have done it earlier.

Instead, DeBord mostly called for Mike Hart to pound into a stacked defensive front and for Henne to take deep drops. Predictably, Hart was stuffed and USC sacked Henne five times in the first half.

What happened after halftime? Carr gave the quick play-by-play: "We make a great stop at the start of the third quarter to get the ball back and then turn the ball over at the short end of the field."

That sounds like bad execution. But it was coaching, too, and here is why:

On their third play of the third quarter, the Wolverines sent freshman Greg Mathews in at receiver. Star Mario Manningham was on the sideline. Now, anybody who has watched the Wolverines knew they were not going to pass to their receivers on that play. I think the Wolverines have a spot on their depth chart for Freshman Receiver We Send Out There Once In a While To Let The Opponent Know We're Not Passing, and this season the guy was Mathews.

Of course, U-M handed the ball to Hart, and he was stopped.

And then -- this was really amazing -- the Wolverines left Mathews in on the next play. Remember: This was the first drive after halftime. So it's not like Manningham was exhausted.

I guess that USC was not all that worried about a deep pass to Greg Mathews. DeBord called for a screen pass to Hart. There were, by my count, 34 USC defenders crowded around the line of scrimmage. They held an elaborate rock-paper-scissors tournament to see who would get to make the interception, and then Lawrence Jackson did the honors.

You want to know the funniest part of all of this?

Michigan is supposedly a candidate to be the No. 1 team in the country next preseason. The Wolverines will lose defensive stars LaMarr Woodley, David Harris and Leon Hall, and will probably lose junior Alan Branch to the NFL, but they have a ton of offensive talent coming back.

I guess people think Michigan has the personnel to outscore almost anybody.

Somebody please tell the coaches.

Contact MICHAEL ROSENBERG at 313-222-6052 or mailto:rosenberg@freepress.com.

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Postby ShoelessJoe » Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:32 pm

BritSox wrote:
Sandrock wrote:
deerayfan072 wrote:
flotsamnjetsam wrote:Man I really wish USC beat UCLA so we could've seen them play Ohio State. I really think that game would've been awesome.


Don't worry when UF will show you a great game, especially when they beat OSU


Now that we see how overrated Michigan really was, it makes me think Florida has a far better shot than I anticipated.


Then again, the fact that both PSU and Wisconsin, by consensus weaker teams than the Buckeyes, both turned over pretty good SEC sides indicates the contrary. I can't say the previous Bowl games have really changed my view- OSU ought to win, but in a two-horse race, the underdog always has a shot, especially with a guy like Meyer calling the shots.


The relationship between OSU and PSU/Wisc was by no way changed by the results of the Jan 1 bowl games alone. If the Buckeyes lose to an SEC team then it can be concluded that PSU/Wisc were not that much weaker than OSU but if Wisc/PSU beat SEC teams then OSU beats an SEC team how does that prove that PSU/Wisc belong in the same class as OSU.

I'm sorry but I just don't think this year's PSU/Wisc teams could hang with OSU.
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Postby BritSox » Wed Jan 03, 2007 6:55 pm

Eh? I wasn't suggesting it meant anything vis-a-vis the relative strengths of OSU/PSU/Wisc. I just don't understand what you're saying. :-?

I meant that, with lesser Big 10 teams beating competitive SEC programs, it makes the entire Big 10 (and hence, OSU) look stronger relative to the SEC.
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Postby A Fleshner Fantasy » Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:36 pm

ShoelessJoe wrote:
BritSox wrote:
Sandrock wrote:
deerayfan072 wrote:
flotsamnjetsam wrote:Man I really wish USC beat UCLA so we could've seen them play Ohio State. I really think that game would've been awesome.


Don't worry when UF will show you a great game, especially when they beat OSU


Now that we see how overrated Michigan really was, it makes me think Florida has a far better shot than I anticipated.


Then again, the fact that both PSU and Wisconsin, by consensus weaker teams than the Buckeyes, both turned over pretty good SEC sides indicates the contrary. I can't say the previous Bowl games have really changed my view- OSU ought to win, but in a two-horse race, the underdog always has a shot, especially with a guy like Meyer calling the shots.


The relationship between OSU and PSU/Wisc was by no way changed by the results of the Jan 1 bowl games alone. If the Buckeyes lose to an SEC team then it can be concluded that PSU/Wisc were not that much weaker than OSU but if Wisc/PSU beat SEC teams then OSU beats an SEC team how does that prove that PSU/Wisc belong in the same class as OSU.

I'm sorry but I just don't think this year's PSU/Wisc teams could hang with OSU.


I am not quite sure I know what you are saying, but something to also keep in mind is not to refer to teams as misalanous SEC teams because keep in mind Florida is better then both the teams playing against PSU and Wisc.
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Postby Atog » Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:50 pm

I've heard from two separate sources--both friends of friends, of course--that Lloyd Carr is planning on retiring and that an announcement is expected this month, if not in the next week.
I'll believe it when I see/hear it, of course, but I feel obligated to let you guys know ;-D
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Postby eman » Thu Jan 04, 2007 12:29 am

I hope he doesn't....this was a bad game for him of course, but he really is a great coach and could do great things for football, even if not at UM. Either way I know I still have the utmost respect for him even after how this game went.

Oh, and in case I haven't said it enough, Jarrett is Godly. As far as the cockiness goes, I dont know. From all Ive seen he had never been cocky before this and I think the excitement of the game caused him to act outside of his usual realm. I havent seen him being cocky any other times, but if he was cocky on other occasions there may be cause for concern.
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