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Poston's = Laughingstocks?

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Poston's = Laughingstocks?

Postby slowkidz » Mon May 03, 2004 6:58 am

Poston Brothers Becoming NFL Laughingstock
http://www.patsfans.com/bob/display_sto ... ry_id=2418

By: Bob George/BosSports.net

Instead of waiting for Ty Law to shut up and accept things as the way they are, let’s instead watch the marvelous things happening regarding Orlando Pace.

The behemoth left tackle for the Rams, and a former number one draft pick at that, is in the second year of being slapped with the franchise tag by the Rams. He wants a long-term deal and wishes to remain in St. Louis. But what is most intriguing about Pace is his recent remarks about what his agents are demanding versus what he’s comfortable getting as a new deal.

At the epicenter of this whole thing are two agent brothers who are fast becoming persona non grata around the NFL. Carl and Kevin Poston, owners of Professional Sports Planning, Inc., have gained a notorious reputation for being tough and unreasonable negotiators over the years. But their shenanigans over the past two years involving six of their high profile clients may one day drive them out of the player agent business, as NFL clubs may become loath to doing business with these two men at all costs.

How bad is the work of the Postons? Law’s outbursts are only the tip of the iceberg.

Pace, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, is okay with a signing bonus in the $15-17 million range. But Carl Poston, Pace’s agent, demanded that the Rams agree to a ludicrous deal worth $71 million over 7 years, with a $27 million signing bonus and $34 million in guaranteed money. Ram president Jay Zygmunt called this contract proposal “ransom money”.

Pace wants to stay in St. Louis more than he wants the money Poston is demanding. He has come out and stated his comfort level in signing bonus. He has also stated that “there will probably be some changes in the future”, a possible hint that he may fire Poston as his agent.

In this case, we are talking about arguably the best left tackle in the business. Tackles make more money than guards and centers, and Pace is a house who deserves to be paid among the highest left tackles in the NFL. But when someone of Pace’s stature comes out and proclaims less money and team loyalty over a ridiculous contract offer from his agent, it makes the agent look like a total and complete buffoon.

The case of Redskin linebacker LeVar Arrington is positively amazing. Arrington is claiming that he was cheated out of a $6.5 million roster bonus. The Redskins claim that no such roster bonus exists in his contract. The Postons came out and admitted that they hadn’t read that part of Arrington’s contract.

An anonymous NFL “insider” used the word “moron” in describing Arrington. How then would you describe the Postons for making this kind of error? Start with “negligent” and “derelict” and go on from there.

The adjective that person used to describe Arrington helps segue into an interesting analysis of Poston clients which came out recently. The article showed six of the high profile Poston clients currently involved in contract issues along with their Wonderlic test scores. The six players, Pace, Law, Arrington, Charles Woodson (Raiders), Ian Gold (Broncos) and Julian Peterson (49ers), all had an average Wonderlic score of a 15.5, which the Pro Football Weekly article said placed the players “somewhere between ‘mildly autistic donkey’ and ‘pile of cracked bricks’ on the overall intelligence scale.” To top it off, Lion receiver Charles Rogers, the third pick in the 2003 draft, had a Wonderlic score of 10, which the article states “puts him in a position to outwit a handful of moist soil.”

Carl Poston, who operates out of Houston, and Kevin Poston, who hangs his hat in the affluent Detroit suburb of Farmington Hills, validate all this with a “creed” that Kevin wrote, a creed which does not state anything to do with sports. This “PSP Creed”, mentioned in a 2003 Detroit Free Press article, has three points which men should live their lives by; they work, they stand for something, and they are loyal. The creed goes on to state that men “settle differences with words, not fists”, “respect women” and they “cry not because they are babies but because they are warriors…with heart.”

But the situations involving their top clients, especially Pace and Arrington, as well as the revelation over the pattern of low Wonderlic scores amongst these same clients, make this creed a total sham which rings completely hollow. The prototypical Poston client is being portrayed as a greedy and idiotic hothead. The Postons are using these clients to make themselves wealthier than they deserve, under the guise of “proud warriors who aren’t afraid to stand up for what they believe in”.

Pace’s stand on his contract issue will perhaps signal the beginning of the end of the wave of terror that is the Postons. If these duped clients can wake up and smell the coffee and figure out what these agents are really all about, they will join Pace and dump these guys on their ears. And if NFL executives can avoid panic and exercise restraint in capitulating to these outrageous demands these brothers make, the Postons will then attain blackball status from the NFL. This might then dissuade these sorts of clients from signing on with them. It would then help drive away the Postons from the NFL, and eventually out of the sports agent business.

It is the job of the sports agent to act in the best interest of his clients. It naturally follows that the agent wants to broker the best deal possible for his client. But when Pace comes out and states that he will take a lot less money to stay put with the Rams, and then obliquely states that he wants to fire his agent, Pace is stating that his agent did not properly serve himself the client, and the Postons have a ton of egg on their faces. And when Arrington is gypped out of $6.5 million because the Postons didn’t read the whole contract, the Postons put a dunce cap right on top of all those yellow yolks.

Michael Holley of the Globe recently wondered aloud about why Law’s friends don’t step up and try to gag him. Maybe Law’s only real buddy is telling Law to continue to blab and blab lots, because Law will be cut in September just like his buddy was in 2003 and he needs to try to get traded or released before that eventuality takes place. Is Lawyer Milloy advising Law to keep flapping his yap? There’s no reason to think otherwise.

Sparing redundancy, this column did a piece recently on what top players in the league reveal themselves to be sooner or later. They are either rings-oriented or rewards-oriented. The Postons continue to try and extort obscene amounts of money for their clients, all the while ignoring that these obscene contracts make their clients rich but severely cripple their team in trying to acquire other talented players who will help that team vie for a Super Bowl championship. The Postons don’t want players in their stable who are committed to winning. They want players in their stable who are committed to making the Postons obscenely rich, and are possibly too stupid to understand that the big money they are demanding is detrimental to the team as a whole.

The NFL looks like it is finally wising up to these two brothers and may begin shunning their clients unilaterally. While the complete eradication of these brothers is perhaps still a dream and, if it happens, would be a few years off in the distance, the statements by Pace and the dereliction of Arrington’s contract are at least opening salvos in the eventual destruction of the Poston empire. To further illustrate this sort of thing, there is the chance that the Patriots might not pursue trading up for Oregon State running back Steven Jackson if he had retained the Postons as his agents (late word says that Jackson has rejected the Postons). If other teams follow suit, the Postons might actually have to stand up and take notice.

This piece was not meant as a plug for the Patriots and their way of doing things. It is simply about the advancement of good agents who will really do well by their clients, and for the cleansing of those agents who stand for the opposite. It might not put Law in his place, but in the long run it might mean that we never see the next Law again.

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Postby slowkidz » Mon May 03, 2004 7:00 am

more...

NFL's unspoken draft-day strategy
http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/spo ... |N&is_rd=Y

Sometimes, teams make picks based on agent

By LES BOWEN

mailto:bowenl@phillynews.com

WHEN DECIDING which prospects to draft, NFL teams look at factors ranging from 40-yard-dash times to the results of personality tests to how players perform in all-star games.

There's one variable that isn't an official part of any team's "draft book," though. It won't be written down on any of the printouts heaped on conference tables across the NFL this week, as the league prepares for the 2004 draft, coming up Saturday and Sunday. Team officials and agents interviewed for this article agreed it probably won't affect the draft position of most players - but it will affect some, even if they never realize it.

That variable is the person the team has to make a deal with after the draft - the player's agent.

"There are a few guys who always hold players out, and who don't re-sign them with the same team when the contract is up, whose players often end up getting the 'franchise' tag," one NFC front-office official said. He said if his team's football people wanted to draft a client of such an agent in the first round, where the stakes are highest, "we'd have to have a talk about that."

The player in question might be such a special talent that the team would decide to proceed anyway. But if he was pretty much the same player as another guy the team could draft in the same spot, whose choice of agent predicted less conflict and uncertainty, the team would take the second player, the official said.

A front-office official for an AFC team echoed those sentiments. For his team, he said, the lengthy rookie holdout is a big potential negative. At some positions, players who miss a decent chunk of training camp spend the rest of the season trying to catch up.

"I don't know if there's ever been an agent who would keep me from wanting to get the best player, but a guy you can't get [into camp] - if [the agent] is notorious for that, you're putting money into someone who won't help you the first year," the AFC official said.

This reluctance doesn't come as news to agents.

"Teams are anxious that the rookie season will be productive," said agent Leigh Steinberg, named this week to Sports Business Journal's list of the 20 most influential sports agents. "An extremely long holdout can retard a rookie's productivity and be a diversion in training camp. Teams try to stay away from those doomsday scenarios...When I talk to the parent of a player, I try to communicate an ability to get the maximum contract while getting a player to camp on time. That's the most difficult task, the trick of our profession."

This spring, one of the favorite topics of the NFL's gossip grapevine has been University of Miami tight end Kellen Winslow Jr.'s decision to hire agent Carl Poston, who along with his brother Kevin runs Professional Sports Planning, with offices in Texas and Michigan. The Postons - who did not return calls seeking comment for this article - are the player representatives whose names come up most often these days when team officials are asked to give examples of agents they see as "trouble."

Currently, there are six unsigned "franchise"-tagged players in the NFL, and three of them are represented by the Postons: Rams offensive tackle Orlando Pace, Raiders cornerback Charles Woodson and 49ers linebacker Julian Peterson.

The Postons represent safety Lawyer Milloy, who was released by the Patriots in a salary dispute just before the 2003 season started, and Pats corner Ty Law, who currently is engaged in an acrimonious negotiation with the team he just helped to win the Super Bowl. They are feuding with the Redskins over whether the team agreed to provide $6.5 million the Postons say is "missing" from the contract linebacker LaVar Arrington signed in December.

"Guys that sign with the Postons will fall in the draft," the NFC team official said. He said such an agent choice would cause him to wonder about the player's mind-set.

"I wouldn't want to see them coming," the AFC team official said.

It will be interesting to see if his agent choice affects Winslow, son of Hall of Fame receiver Kellen Winslow Sr., who is considered a special talent on the order of his former Miami teammate, Jeremy Shockey. Lots of mock drafts have Winslow going around fifth overall Saturday - but there is speculation that the Redskins, who hold the fifth pick, won't draft him because of the Arrington dispute with his agents.

Lots of agents have messy, ugly, public spats with teams over contracts. In most cases, particularly where there is a history of positive dealings, those disputes are quickly forgotten, team officials and agents said.

About 13 months ago, the Eagles were less than pleased with agent Drew Rosenhaus, who represented defensive end Hugh Douglas. The Eagles felt Rosenhaus pulled a fast one on them, adding Jacksonville to the Douglas field at the last minute and then quickly accepting the Jaguars' offer.

But a little more than a month after Douglas left, the Eagles drafted his replacement - Miami defensive end Jerome McDougle, who is represented by Rosenhaus. McDougle held out of training camp for 6 days, then was injured and had little impact as a rookie. So the Eagles went out this offseason and signed free-agent defensive end Jevon Kearse - another Rosenhaus client.

"We have a long history of dealing with Drew," Eagles president Joe Banner said recently. "He's intelligent. He knows what he's doing. He closes deals, and his players [often] re-sign with the same team."

Rosenhaus, ranked 11th on that Sports Business Journal list (Steinberg was 18th), once was considered extremely controversial, particularly among his peers, who have accused him of stealing clients. He seems a little more mainstream these days, perhaps only because he represents so many players from the University of Miami, the NFL's favorite talent trove.

Rosenhaus said he knows it's important that at the end of the day, teams don't feel they are dealing with a madman.

"If a team feels a player has an agent they have been able to get deals done with in the past, that can be a positive factor," said Rosenhaus, who represented 10 Miami Dolphins at the start of last season. "If they feel he has an agent they have not been able to get deals done with, that can be a negative factor, at least in the first round - after the first or second round, there aren't a lot of holdouts."

Agents and team officials said choosing a particular agent can work in a player's favor with a team - usually not in the early rounds, but toward the bottom, where differences are minor. In the late rounds or in signing undrafted free agents, many teams have relationships with agents in their area and will look toward such agents' clients.

Near the top of the draft, it's hard to find an example of a player going higher than he would have otherwise because of an agent.

"A lot of agents sell players on the ability to get them drafted higher," said South Jersey-based agent Jerrold Colton, who has had success mostly representing lower-profile players from area colleges. "In most cases, they're letting their egos get in the way - you're certainly not the reason a player gets picked."

But sometimes, Colton agreed, an agent could be the reason a player didn't get picked as high as he had hoped.
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Postby WarMachine » Mon May 03, 2004 8:12 am

Fire the agents! Is this just too simple a concept?

Watch...They won't even try to work on Winslow's deal until Couch is gone and there's LOTS of cash freed up.

Cross your fingers that they don't make him hold out.
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Postby NFLknowitall » Mon May 03, 2004 11:07 am

The Postons are the reason the Redskins passed on Winslow, it's his own fault for hiring such a$$holes in the first place. Winslow says he will hold a grudge against the Lions and Redskins... for what? hey jerk-o, it's your fault!
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Postby kashikis » Mon May 03, 2004 12:14 pm

I always thought these guys were @$$holes because they don't give proposals that are even high they are plain outrageous.

I hope Pace fires these guys and sends a message. He is a player good enough to get away with this and still gety paid what he's worth no matter what agent he has.
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Postby CC » Mon May 03, 2004 2:33 pm

Plus they jacked 6.5 million from Levar Arrington.
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Postby terpfan » Mon May 03, 2004 7:59 pm

as canacuna would say...

the postons suX0rz s0x0rz... or something like that.
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Postby TTTBone » Mon May 03, 2004 8:39 pm

Jeez, how do I become a sports agent? These mentally-unspectacular Poston's are playing the players egos all the way to the bank.
Carl Poston, who operates out of Houston, and Kevin Poston, who hangs his hat in the affluent Detroit suburb of Farmington Hills, validate all this with a creed that Kevin wrote, a creed which does not state anything to do with sports. This PSP Creed, mentioned in a 2003 Detroit Free Press article, has three points which men should live their lives by; they work, they stand for something, and they are loyal. The creed goes on to state that men settle differences with words, not fists, respect women and they cry not because they are babies but because they are warriors with heart.

Sounds like some Promisekeepers bullcrap, or maybe some half-a**ed cultish, "We're here to help you" junk.
Two easy-money jobs... Cult leader, Sports Agent. All about manipulating egos for an easy profit.
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Postby Canacuna » Mon May 03, 2004 9:21 pm

terpfan wrote:as canacuna would say...

the postons suX0rz s0x0rz... or something like that.


That looks about right... ;-D

The Postons' sux0r s0x0rz, y0. :-t

...or something.
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Postby Cornbread Maxwell » Tue May 04, 2004 10:03 am

The most telling aspect of the above article is the wonderlick scores of their clients.
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